Crambeck Village Tree Survey

Crambeck Village is set in a wooded area, but there are also many trees within the village itself. There is quite a nice collection, for a small village, and so far, 40 different species have been identified.

The interactive map below has been produced to provide a record of the type, and location of the trees. Most of the trees shown have been identified, but the survey is on-going, and the details will be updated from time to time.

A little information about each species can be found by pressing “more details” in the call out box for any of the trees, or by scrolling down the page. It is intended that further information about each type of tree will be added in the future.

Tree Species

1. Alder  Alnus glutinosa

Native to Europe, western Asia and northern Africa. It is often dominant in marshy ground, and on river banks. The timber can be used for waterside structures, and has been used for making clogs.

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2. Ash   Fraxinus excelsior

Native to Europe, including Britain and Ireland. It is normally the last wild tree into leaf, and one of the first to lose them, often leaving bunches of seeds (keys) in the branches. It is susceptible to “Ash dieback” – Chalara fraxinea.

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3. Beech  Fagus  sylvatica

Native to southern and western Europe. It is a good timber tree, famously used for furniture making, especially chairs. The seeds are called nuts, which are collectively known as mast.

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4. Black Pine  Pinus nigra

Originally from southern Austria to central Italy and the Balkans. Widely used in many countries for wind breaks and timber production.

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5. Blue Atlas Cedar  Cedrus atlantica ‘Glauca’

Native to the Atlas Mountains, Algeria and Morocco. This is a true cedar, generally grown for ornament. Regarded as the best of all “blue” forms of conifer.

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6. Cherry  Prunus sp.

Native to Japan and China. It has lovely pink blossom early in spring, before the leaves.

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7. Common Holly  Ilex aquifolium

Native to Europe and western Asia. The dark green, prickly, evergreen leaves and bright red berries are well known in Europe as a traditional Christmas decoration. The wood is hard and fine grained, so is used in turned work, marquetry, engraving, and making printing blocks.

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8. Copper Beech  Fagus  sylvatica ‘Purpurea’

This is a form of beech where the chlorophyll in the leaves is masked by an anthocyanin pigment, which colours them varying shades of purple.

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9. Cut-leaved Rowan  Sorbus aucuparia ‘Aspleniifolia’

Originally from Europe and northern Africa. This is a variant of mountain ash, in which the leaflets have jagged edges.

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10. Deodar Cedar  Cedrus deodara

Native to the western Himalayas and Afghanistan. The timber is soft, but durable, and is widely used in buildings and furniture. Its resin has been used for embalming.

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11. English Elm  Ulmus minor var. vulgaris

Native in England. This species was once widespread, but is susceptible to Dutch Elm disease, so most trees have died. Young trees are likely to die before maturity.

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12. English Oak  Quercus robur

Native across Europe, including Britain and Ireland, to the Caucasus. The dominant large tree across much of Britain, supporting a greater variety of leaf-eating insects than any other. Its strong durable timber was used extensively for ships and construction, and continues to be used for furniture, buildings and many other applications.

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13. False Acacia  Robinia pseudoacacia

Native of eastern USA. Also called the Black Locust tree. Clusters of fragrant white flowers are produced in spring.

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14.Holm Oak  Quercus ilex

Native to southern Europe. Its evergreen foliage makes it a useful tree for screens, windbreaks and hedging.

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15. Hornbeam  Carpinus betulus

Native to Europe, including south eastern England. The name means “Hard Tree”, and the timber has been used for chopping blocks and mallets.

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16. Horse Chestnut  Aesculus hippocastanum

Native to northern Greece and Albania. It is commonly known as the “conker” tree. It is unrelated to Sweet Chestnut trees, but the fruits have a similar appearance.

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17. Laburnum  Laburnum sp.

Native to central and southern Europe. The timber is valued for cabinet making, but the whole tree is highly poisonous. It produces long strings of yellow flowers in late spring.

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18. Larch  Larix sp.

Native to southern and central Europe. The tree is deciduous, which is unusual for a conifer – the needles turn golden and are shed in Autumn. A fast growing tree, making strong, durable timber.

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19. Lawson’s Cypress  Chamaecyparis lawsoniana

Native to California and Oregon, where it is called Port Orford Cedar. The male cones are red, and seen on the end of the leaves in spring.

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20. Leylandii  Cupressocyparis leylandii

This is a hybrid between a Monterey and a Nootka cypress, first known in Powys. Now it is the most planted garden tree, usually for hedging. It is loved by birds, because of the dense cover it provides.

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21. Lime  Tilia × europaea

A natural hybrid, common in Britain and Europe. It is the one of the tallest broadleaved trees in Britain. The timber is particularly good for carving.

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22. Mountain Ash  Sorbus aucuparia

Originally from Europe and northern Africa.  The tree survives higher on Scottish mountains than any other tree. It is famous for its red berries in autumn.

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23. Nordmann Fir  Abies nordmanniana

Originally from north eastern Turkey and western Caucasus mountains.  It is also called Caucasian Fir. In its native habitat, it is Europe’s tallest tree – 70m. It is often used as a non-drop Christmas tree.

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24. Norway Maple  Acer platanoides

Native to Europe (excluding Britain and Ireland), and the Caucasus. The leaves are the classic maple shape, with 5 lobes, but each lobe has 3 – 5 whisker tips. Bright green-yellow flowers in erect bunches come out before the leaves.

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25. Norway Spruce  Picea abies

Native in Europe, southwards from southern Scandinavia to the Alps. It is the traditional Christmas tree.

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26. Rowan × Whitebeam  Sorbus × intermedia

Hybrids between the very different rowans and whitebeams occur occasionally in the wild and have been brought into cultivation. They look more like whitebeams with a broad leaf that is paler underneath, but usually have distinct lobing in the lower part of the leaf.

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27. Silver Birch  Betula pendula

Native in Europe, including Britain and Ireland. It is a fast growing coloniser, often the first to appear in clearings, and waste ground.

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28. Sitka Spruce  Picea sitchensis

Native from Alaska to northern California. The commonest forestry conifer in wet areas of Britain. The leaves/needles are sharply spiny.

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29. Sycamore   Acer pseudoplatanus

Native to Europe, as far north as Paris. The tree supports a high insect population, so is attractive to birds. Its timber is surprisingly valuable.

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30. Tree of Heaven  Ailanthus altissima

Native to China. It is cultivated mainly for its foliage – huge compound leaves, about 60cm long.

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31. Turkey Oak  Quercus cerris

Originally from south eastern France to Turkey. The acorn cups are hairy. The wood tends to split, so it is worthless as a timber tree.

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32. Walnut  Juglans regia

Native from south eastern Europe, through the Himalaya and northern Burma to south western China. The timber is valuable, so trees are dug out, rather than felled, as the best wood is at the base.

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33. Weeping Ash  Fraxinus excelsior ‘Pendula’

Originally from Europe and eastern Asia. The weeping type is grafted onto common ash stock. The tree produces winged seeds, called keys.

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34. Weeping Willow  Salix × sepulcralis ‘Chrysocoma’

Deriving its habit from Chinese weeping willow. Grown as an ornamental tree, valued for its shape and long yellowish shoots in winter.

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35. Wellingtonia  Sequoiadendron giganteum

Originally from California. An example called “General Sherman” is thought to be the largest tree in the world. The spongy bark is a defence against forest fires. It has useless soft timber.

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36. Western Red Cedar  Thuja plicata

Originally from north western America and related to the cypresses rather than true cedars. Grown as a timber tree in Scotland. The species most commonly used for totem poles in America.

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37. Whitebeam  Sorbus aria

Native to southern and central Europe, including southern England. The backs of the leaves are “white”, and very conspicuous when windy.

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38. Willow  Salix sp.

Native to Europe, including Britain and Ireland. The willow genus has the widest geographical distribution of any group of trees with over 300 species. The seeds will only germinate in damp soil, so many trees are found along river banks, and marshy ground.

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39. Willow-leaved Pear  Pyrus salicifolia ‘Pendula’

Native from the Caucasus to northern Iran. It is a small ornamental tree, with silvery leaves in spring.

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